League of Legends LCS: My Life, or 6 months, as a fan

I never thought I’d get into competitive pro League; the LCS (League of Legends Championship Series)

I watch a lot of competitive Team Fortress 2; so I supposed I should have guessed it would become a thing.

At first I wasn’t sure. So many of the players looked so young. They seemed so vulnerable. How could I support something like that? It felt somehow dirty. Like the Hunger Games. Or Battle Royale. Children fighting children. It was a first step. The way down the proverbial slippery slope

I could see a picture, unfolding, in my mind:

Riot: Hey let’s make Summoners Rift real. The teams can fight each other with real weapons, with blood, gore, children killing each other, dying, bodies ripped apart……crying

Berath’s Brain Burps: Rarr. ggwp

No, just a bad thing all round.

However, I slowly began to get to know the teams. Some of the players were actually adults, some even had receding hairlines. The age limit was 17+ so even the youngest looking ones only looked like babies because I’m an old fart.

So yes, I started to follow the matches and I found myself becoming a fan, I think round June or July of this year. This was a first for me and opened up a new world. I’ve never followed football or rugby or anything similar. I’ve never followed a band or singer. Now I found myself with a team to support; Fnatic (chosen because the players seemed jolly and they were some of the first ones I managed to identify consistently). Later I found out they actually won games too.

It was an interesting experience being a fan. It wasn’t exactly comfortable. It gave me an insight into what it must be like to be football fan. I’d always considered them alien, rooting for a team; rejoicing in their triumphs, sorrowing at their defeats, but now I found myself following Fnatic games anxiously and compulsively on my phone when away from my pc. I’d put time aside to watch matches, I’d plan my evenings. I wanted Fnatic to win. And not just win. To crush. To steamroll. To destroy their opponents, to bathe in their tears, to laugh at their suffering and dance on their graves.  As a long time Guardian reader and qualified social worker, I found this disconcerting.

I hadn’t realised the proper nature of the player-fan link either. I’d understood how fans idolise; a player favouring a tweet could send one into thrilled ecstasy, no exaggeration. However what I hadn’t properly gleaned was how players needed their fans in return; how they enjoyed their gifts and tweets. It stood to reason really, we all need approval and to feel accepted.

Then came the chaos of the off-season and, thank goodness, Fnatic fell apart and so I could get off the emotional rollercoaster that I’d found myself on as a Fnatic supporter (I’m sorry Fnatic, I’m writing about me, not you). I’m not going to be a fan again in the same way. I’ve done that. Once burnt. I’m just going to follow the players, not a team, and avoid the stress of games and roster changes. I’m looking forward to the LCS Spring Split now. I can just be casually interested in all the teams and in how various players will perform. It should be good.

(and not even start to think about Origen possibly qualifying in the Summer Split)

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About Berath

Interests: zombies, giant robots, kittens

Posted on December 18, 2014, in Competitive play, League of Legends and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink. 1 Comment.

  1. LOL! 😀 I still like the mental Image of Riot bringing the game into the real world. But that aside, I’m glad to hear you’ve broke you fanaticism for Fnatic B|

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